Alton Illinois Weather

The gradual increase in planet-wide temperatures has now been well documented and accepted by scientists as a fact. Months of heat and low rainfall are taking their toll on Tasmania's east coast, and dry weather has brought much of the country's annual rainfall to a halt for the first time in more than a century. A huge illustration of this fearsome animal exists on a limestone rock above the Mississippi. Its foundation dates back to the 18th century, when Father Jacques Marquette, in a recording by Louis-Joliet Piasa, described Piasa as "a bird-like monster" painted on the limestone cliffs where the city of Alton, Illinois, is now located on the Missouri River, just south of where it stands today. The orchestra was founded in the 1840s, and when he recorded in Louis, near Jolie, Missouri, in 1851, he described it as a "bird-like" monster that had been "painted" on both sides of the Mississippi and "where it is today," according to a local historian.

A reconstruction of the pictograph, called Piasa the Bird, is seen on a limestone rock in Alton, Illinois, where the original is believed to be. Its foundation dates back to the 18th century, when Father Jacques Marquette, in a recording by Louis-Joliet Piaa, described him as a "bird-like monster" painted on the limestone cliffs where he is now on the Mississippi, just south of where he stands today. Two murals painted by the Indians, one from the early 1800s and the other from 1851, show a giant bird with long tail and large head and a pair of wings.

As the original piasas faded and new Americans replaced them, they kept the myth alive, according to the National Park Service. The park is located south of Piaa Painted Rock in Alton, Illinois, north of the Illinois-Missouri border.

Alton is a destination for birdwatchers along the Mississippi Flyway during migration season, and winter visitors come to see bald eagles breeding on Illinois' limestone cliffs and feeding on fish in the river. On the Missouri side is the Audubon Center for the Riverlands, which is one of the best places to see birds around the world, as it is located where the Arkansas River, Missouri River and Great Rivers River meet. Next to the dam on the Illinois side is the National Great River Museum, which offers a visit to the dam several times a day. Summer is hot and humid in Alton, winter is very cold and windy, but it is partly cloudy all year round.

The windiest day of the year is April 1 with gusts of up to 50 km / h and a windy day this year with gusts of up to 40 km / h or more.

Based on the tourism score is the best time of year to visit Alton for warm weather activities, from mid-June to the end of August. According to this calculation, the most popular times to visit Alton are mid-June to late August. Wind is the second most common cause of travel delays in the state of Illinois. Daylight saving time (Daylight saving time) is observed from spring (14 March) and lasts 7-8 months and ends in autumn (7 November).

The average dew point in Alton is 24 degrees from mid-June to the end of August, with a peak of 26 degrees on average. During the summer months of June, July, August and September, dew points are usually above 26 degrees. Q. It averages 26 degrees Celsius from the end of June to the end of September.

The average dew point in Alton is 24 degrees from mid-June to the end of August, with a peak of 26 degrees in August.

The average dew point in Alton is 24 degrees from mid-June to the end of August, with a peak of 26 degrees in August.

With this lesson and printable references, as well as an interactive map, students of all ages will learn the science behind weather forecasts.

Visit a mythical monster depicted on a cliff above the Mississippi north of Alton. The old dragon is called Piasa bird (pronounced "cake - saw") and lives in a cave on the steep slope above the river.

The first discovery of the Piasa Bird was reported in 1673, when Jacques Marquette, a native of St. Louis County, spotted a painting of the animal sailing on the river near the present-day city of Alton, Illinois. The painting, known as "Piaa the Bird," is said to have been executed by Indians on a rock above Alston, Illinois, and was taken by Jacques Marquette in 1673.

More About Alton

More About Alton